Places/hotels/Cult TV - The Portmeirion Hotel

The Portmeirion Hotel
retrosellers review - The Portmeirion hotel

The Portmeirion hotel
75 years of service  1926-2001

The Portmeirion hotel     Clough Williams-Ellis, architect and designer of Portmeirion Castell Deudraeth at The Portmeirion hotel

"Cherish the Past
Adorn the Present
Construct for the Future"
Clough Williams-Ellis, architect and designer of Portmeirion

The Portmeirion hotel was first opened 75 years ago by architect, designer and visionary Clough Williams-Ellis. His aim was to develop on the existing natural beauty of a peninsular in North Wales without spoiling it. Famous clients were attracted from the start - George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells, Bertrand Russell and Noel Coward amongst them. In fact, some of their famous works were written at Portmeirion.
Patrick McGoohan, whilst filming an episode of Danger Man at the hotel and its grounds in the early sixties, was so impressed with the setting that he came back in 1966 and persuaded Clough Williams-Ellis to allow filming of his tour de force The Prisoner there. The show achieved cult status and is still hugely popular and influential today. And, since then, the hotel, now clearly the perfect setting for McGoohan's 'village',  has been inextricably linked with that series. Even viewed today, the series is rather timeless and shows off the hotel and the surrounding landscape incredibly well. And the Portmeirion hotel is as beautiful today as it has always been - in fact, constant improvements and developments in the tradition and spirit of its founder have meant that it is an even more spectacular place to visit or to stay than ever.

An aerial view, as often seen in The Prisoner, shows the sheer beauty and appeal of the location and of the architecture which Portmeirion offers. Within each of the diverse buildings are rooms of the hotel, each with its own individuality and atmosphere.


Aerial view of Portmeirion
Aerial view of Portmeirion

Reminiscent of The Prisoner, the hotel provides a map and guide book in each room for their guests but, unlike The Prisoner, you are free to roam and explore the hotel grounds and beyond to your heart's content
A hotel room A hotel room
A hotel room A hotel room
The hotel has several shops and restaurants. Souvenirs, including miniatures of the various landmarks and buildings of the hotel, as well as memorabilia from The Prisoner, are available to buy. There are cafes, an ice cream parlour, a beauty parlour, a bookshop, a card shop, pottery shops and a Prisoner Information Centre
Topiary in the grounds
Topiary in the grounds
The hotel's newest venture is Castell Deudraeth. It has eleven rooms, each of which boasts King or Queen size beds, whirlpool baths, real flame gas fires, oak floors with underfloor heating, wide screen TVs and DVD.
"The hotel is classy, modern, restrained and quite unlike anything this part of North Wales has ever seen." The Observer.
Castell Deudraeth
Castell Deudraeth
There is an open air swimming pool, a tennis court and a nearby golf course. There are 70 acres of sub-tropical woodlands surrounding the hotel
The Town Hall
The Town Hall
The hotel is family friendly and provides cots or extra beds. Some rooms are at ground level although some are reached by short flights of steps. Portmerion is open all year, apart from a few weeks in January. Self-catering is also an option, as the village has 17 cottages within the grounds, ranging in size from those sleeping two to those sleeping eight people.
The Town Hall
The Town Hall - front
Each year the hotel attracts over 200,000 visitors. These days it is managed by the grandson of the hotel's creator, Clough Williams-Ellis. Mr Robin Llywelyn continues to follow his grandfather's fine tradition of development and improvement without compromising beauty.
The Gothic Pavilion
The Gothic Pavilion

The Bristol Colonnade gets its title from the fact that the building was originally situated in Bristol, some 200 miles away, and had fallen into disrepair. It was transported and rebuilt at Portmeirion in 1959.

The Bristol Colonnade
The Bristol Colonnade
The Round House is actually too small to house a lounge, kitchen, bathroom and bedroom. This often surprises visitors who recall the building from The Prisoner and who expect it to be, rather like Dr. Who's Tardis, bigger on the inside than it is on the outside!........
The Round House
The Round House

...... The room, which was Patrick McGoohan's 'prison' for 17 episodes of The Prisoner, is now a shop selling Prisoner merchandise and memorabilia. Like Clough Williams-Ellis, McGoohan had a vision and, between them, they created monuments which have stood the test of time.

The Prisoner Shop     
Number six's home
The Prisoner Shop Number six's 'home' in The Prisoner
The Piazza was built in 1965. The pool and fountain are listed Grade II, as are a significant number of the buildings in Portmerion. It featured prominently in the filming of episodes of The Prisoner the following year.
The Piazza
The Piazza

We look forward to seeing you here and welcome any enquiries or feedback. For details of room tariffs and availability, please contact the hotel as follows:

Website: The Portmeirion Hotel
Email: enquiries@portmeirion-village.com

Robin Llywelyn, Managing Director
PORTMEIRION
Gwynedd, LL48 6ET, Cymru/Wales

Tel: 01766 770228, Fax: 01766 771331
From outside the UK: 00 44 1766 770228/771331

More details on The Prisoner can be found in the Special Features section of this website, including interviews with two of the stars, Annette André and Jane Merrow


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